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his criticism of eu integration at the world economic forum in davos. >> gender equality in the united states -- the pentagon lifts its ban on women in front line and combat roles. >> on the chopping block, germany's second-largest bank plans to fire up to 10% of its work force. the european union is at a crossroads, and the british prime minister, david cameron, says if the blockheads towards the centralized political union, then it is not for him and not for britain. >> german chancellor angela merkel has chosen her words very carefully, responding at the world economic forum in davos by voicing conditional optimism as far as europe's future goes. she says that patience is needed for structural reforms to take effect. >> she has also called for more regulation of the finance industry to avoid more turbulence, a point of contention with britain. both agree that competitiveness is the key, but how to go about that is the big question. >> david cameron brought his message with him to the swiss alps. in his address to the world leaders in doubles, he repeated his demands for big changes
because there are so many e.u. trips that i have been on with the bush administration and the obama administration where they blame the united states for bringing down the rest of the world when it comes to its state of the economy. it looks like now things are almost reversed in a way. tell us about your conversation with cameron. >> when i interviewed prime minister cameron here in new york and he was sort of in the lion's den because he had thrown down the gauntlet with this speech about britain's position in the european union. britain is not fully in in terms of it is not part of the eurozone. it doesn't have the euro but in many aspects it is in and it is a full member. united states depends on britain for the very strong role in international affairs. it helps all over the place whether in trying to confront iran, syria and north korea with sanctions and plays a big role whether afghanistan, iraq. david cameron is saying we like our foreign role. we like you and our economic role in the e.u. but we don't want to be a part of your political role. he is trying to negotiate a ha
the e.u. to impose sanctions on hezbollah, and you have been a believer that we should not do it alone, we should do with unilateral. what we do take the chance and urged the european union to sanction has a lot? is we shouldn insurer swer not be writing lesser proof, i think the president is the appropriate official. >> and congress has no interest in whether the e.u. would be sanctioned as a terrorist or a station? >> the congress has a responsibility in a lot of things. >> that me ask you this about the iranian revolutionary guard. he said a minute ago you think they are a terrorist recession. do you agree? bailout yes. >> and you voted against the amendment designating them as a terrorist organization because they are recognized as a state? iran, you would not want to designate the army of a recognized as a terrorist? >> i just clarify a statement on iran being a recognized nation by the nine nations, by most world bodies. the reason why i did not vote as 22 other members that because i think jim webb's argument was a strong argument, and that is we have -- and this is what he said
to israel, but what they pose to america. when they call on the eu to designate hezbollah terrorist organization. they cite the damage that hezbollah has done to american military men and women and american security interests and for steve to just, you know, like sweep this away is, this is just israel and israel supporters wanting a bunch of love letters is really, i'd say, actually, offensive. if you look -- why is ben carden. senior democrat in a democratic conference. he came out today. so, this is a senior democrat knowing that the president of his party is about to nominate chuck hagel for secretary of defense and ben carden is raising serious questions. yet, another democrat to raise questions. what is giving them pause? i don't think it's as simple as steve just dismissed it. these love letters or disagreement over some love letters to israel. real national security issues at stake. senator hagel was opposed to sanctions against syria. one of a handful of sanctions -- >> i want to get steve to respond to you on that. i want to throw in this issue. what is a bigger issue for
a strong u.k. and a strong e.u. so i'm wondering what the white house makes of the announcement today that there will be a referendum on that issue and what the united states has at stake in the u.k. staying part of the e.u. >> we welcome the prime minister's call for britain to remain in the e.u. and to retain a leading role in europe's institutions and as the president told the prime minister when they spoke last week, the united states values a strong united kingdom and a strong european union. we value our central relationship with the u.k. as well as our relationship with the european union which makes critical contributions to peace, prosperity and security in europe and around the world. we believe that the united kingdom is stronger as a result of its european union's membership and we believe the european union is stronger as a result of having the united kingdom in the e.u. so that's -- our views on this are very clear. the internal process by which these matters are considered within the u.k. or any other country are obviously the province of those countries and those gover
is qualifying for e.u. bail-out money. 2013 is bringing more protests. young and old in athens. unemployment in greece is higher than spain. and pensions are slinking. >> we are rapidly going backwards. far backwards. the only battle is the battle on the street. >> greece is trying to keep a lid on things. mass transit strike in the second week. officials say they will jail workers if they don't go back on the job. greeks are tired. this is a hassle but what can we do? >> this is watched by the u.s. wall street buffeted by the european trouble. washington planning austerity moves and taxes and all are hoping what has happened in europe isn't a preview of years to come. bret? >> bret: greg palkot in london. thanks. >>> you have heard the talk is cheap. the promises are not. concerns entitlements and how to pay for them. jim angle says the president didn't shed light on that earlier in week. >> treated like innellis. he had several issues in inaugural address but one in particular stuck out to some. comment about entitlement. s. >> the commitment we make to each other, through medicare and soc
the sum total of all of your votes, refusing to sign a letter to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to guard terrorist terrorist organization, one of two to vote on sanction this body tried to make on iran and the statements you made after palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all of that together, that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> i would not agree with that. if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, vote to say the iranian revolutionary guard was terrorist organization would you vote no? >> times change. it recognize that. yes, i would reconsider. >> thank you. that encouraging. >> bret: interesting exchange with lindsey graham. back with the panel. you talk about senator graham's exchange with chuck hagel. >> now that we have shown everyone how spontaneous and non-rehearsed we, are i was thinking of the tape where he quotes hagel saying the jewish lobby has intimidated senators in to voting
for sanctions in syria. he wouldn't sign a letter to the eu to designation hezbollah a terrorist organization. if he does have a problem here, jonathan, is it going to be that republicans have made the argument he's beyond the mainstream or something we don't know about yet. >> it could be one or the other. that's why the confirmation hearings are going to be vitally important. right now as you said at the top of the show, both sides, the pro-hagel people and anti-hagel people are engaged in a bit of a campaign to sort of set of narrative for who this person could be as secretary of defense. before he sits before the confirmation hearings and answer questions, tough questions from democrats and republicans alike, on all of these issues from his support of israel to his criticisms of the iraq war, the afghanistan war, the -- his unwillingness to sign that letter designating hamas as a terrorist organization, these are all questions he's going to have to answer and how he answers them could very well determine whether he's confirmed or not. >> well, he started to answer them a little bit. he di
be talking about the e.u. or you could be talking about washington. we will flip a coin with cnbc's andrew ross sorkin when he joins us live from davos, switzerland. next on "now." [ male announcer ] there's a story behind the silver of philadelphia cream cheese. it always begins with fresh, local milk, blended with real wholesome cream. going fresh from the farm, to our fridge, in just six days. because we believe in fresh taste. that's the way we set the standard for intensely rich, luscious flavor. so our story of fresh taste always ends... deliciously. when it comes to taste, philadelphia sets the standard. >>> the white house announced today that the president will renominate richard kcordrake and tap mary joe white to lead the s.e.c. as the president tries to bring stability and reform to american financial dealings, republicans seem intent on keeping the country's economy as unstable as possible. the house averted the debt ceiling fight. at least some republicans. 33 members of the house gop still broke rank. by averting, we, of course, mean punting the ticking time bomb three month
proposal, set forth by the uk independent commission on banking and the eu's group. sir john vickers, chairman of the independent commission, has argued criticized the coalition government and the backing away from his original proposal. while the european commission's recent report summarizes the responses received and it acknowledges the widespread opposition of a proposal in a determinedly understated action. it argues that a compelling case for mandatory separation of trading activities hasn't been made. they felt that the proposal is not backed by the required evidence and that there was a need for thorough impact assessment. with all due respect my to my friends in the european financial regulatory community, what a regulatory proposal is used within the eu, considered too harsh on the financial industry and harmful to markets, it's a clear sign that it's time to take a step back and reevaluate. regardless of what happens respect to the proposals, even if all of the most vitriolic allegations set forth are true, even if our financial giants act solely and ruthlessly out of self
trying to convince the e.u. to designate hezbollah as a global terrorist organization. this will be some interesting hearings and i think the senate will ask some pretty tough questions. jenna: to generalize that that that is interesting because it is about being able to name who our enmy -- enemies are in a broad context. general scales, senator kerry and senator hagel, both vets and supporters of the military and critics of the military as well. how do you have the two vets in high positions potentially? what would that mean? >> that's a great question. first of all i tend to support the person over the policy. i testified before senator hagel's committee in 2007 over the surge and i talked with him at length after my testimony. i will tell you this. one thing that struck me about him is enormous empathy for the american soldier. and as the military draws down he is going to be a person i think who maintains the trust and the compact that the government has with our returning veterans from iraq and afghanistan. so here's a buy who has seen war, who understands the nature and character
barack obama and the eu, i think even hillary clinton would agree at this point, what difference does it make? which, by the way is going to be her campaign slogan in 2016. the nobel peace prize should go to people who risk their lives and doing heroic work and whose efforts will be magna advertised by recognition from this award. hillary clinton does not risk her life. she does not do heroic work. i have been waiting all day to hear from mr. garland nixon about what she has done for any tangible effort at peace whatsoever. >> garland, let us know? what do you think? >> a couple of things. first of all with former president clinton, if you look at the clinton foundation, they have donated upwards of $30 million to haiti since the earthquake. they have been responsible for literally millions of people getting -- in africa getting medication for h.i.v. and aids. it's hard to question the clinton foundation and what they have done. >> what about hillary? secretary clinton i should say. >> one of the important things she has done is taken the state department in a fundamentally different
. 89 senators voted for it. he voted against it. a letter to the eu asking the eu to designate hezbollah a terrorist organization. 88 senators signed it. he was one of the ones who didn't. when there was a letter to russia asking to deal with the rising tide of anti-semitism in russia. 99 senators signed the letter, one did not, chuck hagel. he has the right to have those interviews but there is a bipartisan consensus in washington illustrated by the math outside it. the question is why does the president want that in the discussion? why does he want that person with those judgments running the pentagon at this time? those are important questions to be explored during the hearing. >> he should have the opportunity to answer that. he has made clear on matters that impact israel the most in a positive way, i would not have been on the side of senator hagel in those votes, important to answer it and important to look at his entire record. on the things that matter most with u.s. policy and our great ally, israel, he has been as responsible as any when it comes to financial support
british voters to decide whether or not they should exit the eu by 2017. cameron argued for continued membership but in a more streamlined european union with fewer restrictive regulations. >> from our parade of papers, "the omaha world herald," the governor of nebraska has given the okay for the keystone pipeline to run through his state effectively leaving the decision now of whether or not to green-light the 1700-mile project to the obama administration. the president has pushed back a decision on the project until after march, but the pipeline's future remains in doubt as president obama rejected a plan a year ago, you'll recall, saying the legislation didn't give enough time for the government to give it a thorough review. >> and you know, michael steele, we were talking this morning about how the republicans move forward in a more thoughtful, strategic way. still being tough. >> yeah. >> you can be tough. you can be conservative. you can still be smart. >> be smart. that's right. >> we haven't been smart. a guy who has been smart, chris christie. new quinnipiac poll numbers out
kerry would be a very effect t*eu secretary of state because he could carry out president obama's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to te
ol skr*eus tha anesthesiologist that puts people to sleep and wakes them up for a living. they say consolidation is very important and it happens while we are sleeping. what is it? >> husbands can now use this as an excuse as to why they forgot to take the trash out because they didn't get a good night sleep. whaoeufpl we are sleeping the brain is working and it's working on over time to consolidate memories. what this means is that things that we encounter during the day, conscious or subconscious they get processed in networks or frame works within the brain. they get sorted based upon some common patterns and they also get stored and downloaded, similar to when you back up your computers. it's a process that will store all the memory that you need to have. jaime: let's say you're not a good sleeper. >> absolutely. jaime: how bad a shape are you in, then? jaime: what they've been showing is that the brain basically functions on delta waives during deep sleep and normally right now when we're talking we are having alpha and beta waves which are fast low voltage waves. when you get
that everybody's responsible for success and, of course, for 25eu8 -- for failure as well. >> i like to remind people that as brilliant as the uav drone system is, at the end of the day, there has to be someone who tells it where to fly which in many cases, not all cases, is usually a human source. in the hunt for zarqawi, it's clear that the debriefing of a detainee was vitally important to the outcome. and we know from certain movies floating around now that detainee interrogation is a very important issue. and, of course, that raises the question of how you interrogate detainees. in the book you are about as clear as anyone i've ever seen. you say torture is, quote, self-defeating. you describe the very elaborate steps you took to make sure that any detainee in your chain of command was not abused and was housed in a facility of that have, well, it wasn't a five-star hilton, but it was an appropriate facility. and at one point you said to your troops that anyone who was involved in detainee abuse would be court-martialed and expels from the task force. expelled from the task force. why did
refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, i did vote against it. >> i
total of all of your votes refusing to sign a letter to the eu, asking has a lot to be designated as a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to designate the iranian revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, being one of two to vote against sanctions this body was trying to impose on iran, the statements you have made about palestinians and the jewish lobby -- all of that together, that the image you have created is one of sending the worst possible signal to our enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> no, i would not agree with that because i have taken actions and made statements very clear as to what i believe hezbollah and hamas are as terrorist organizations. >> if there was a vote on the floor of the senate this afternoon to label the iranian national -- revolutionary guard, the people that killed soldiers in iraq, some of the most vicious people to the people of iran themselves, if there was a vote would you still vote no? >> i would want to know from the president what they were doing. ask i mean you read the paper, you w
organization by the united states and in 2006 he was only one of only 12 senators who refused to write the eu asking them to declare hezbollah a terrorist organization. why did he do that? >> chuck hagel is his own man. he wears no man's collar and he will continue to be his own man. that is the kind of person you want as secretary of state, when you're in the room deciding about war and peace. you want somebody to give their honest opinion. chuck hagel's opinions can come out in the hearings and the american people can decide. there's no question about the fact that the senate i think will ultimately confirm by an overwhelming majority chuck hagel as secretary of defense because nobody is going to really seriously consider violating the president's choice here in the middle of a war, in the middle of a shooting war. >> senator cleland, it's good to see you. thank you so much for joining us. >> thank you. >>> on monday the president said his cia nominee, john brennan, helped him create the strategy that has devastated the leadership of al qaeda. senior correspondent john m
at the e.u. level. we have been for investigation for it almost two years by the commissioner there and his staff. during this period, they comment from everybody and we give them literally millions of documents. we are busy negotiating with them. we don't think we violated any european laws, but we're happy to have the conversation and 're sort of now waiting on with a they decide to do. we have been negotiating back and forth and they have announced that publicly. in the united states, the law is similar but different if the way it's applied. in our indication, the government to have the federal trade commission look at this and a similar investigation is underway. there were a sers of hearings. i testified at the hearings and, again, i don't see the consumer arm under section 2 and we have asked the government to come back and give us the examples of things which are violations of law. we haven't seen that yet we are also in negotiations with them. that's probably all i should y. what i would say is we talk to these people a lot. we're waiting on them at some level. the ideal scenarioou
in europe and the u.s. the european process is a finding at the e.u. level. we have been for investigation for it almost two years by the commissioner there and his staff. during this period, they comment from everybody and we give them literally millions of documents. we are busy negotiating with them. we don't think we violated any european laws, but we're happy to have the conversation and we're sort of now waiting on with a they decide to do. we have been negotiating back and forth and they have announced that publicly. in the united states, the law is similar but different if the way it's applied. in our indication, the government to have the federal trade commission look at this and a similar investigation is underway. there were a series of hearings. i testified at the hearings and, again, i don't see the consumer arm under section 2 and we have asked the government to come back and give us the examples of things which are violations of law. we haven't seen that yet. we are also in negotiations with them. that's probably all i should say. what i would say is we talk to these people
enlarging the stability in europe itself by enlarging our institution, the eu or nato. what's happened to that agenda? is a no longer a part of the democratic countries? and if the answer is was so care about -- are whether georgia can become more stable, how do we get smarter about it? it isn't obvious our institutions hold the same if you used to hold five or six years ago. it isn't obvious that comes like ukraine had to stay democratizing instinct, the country of central europe had 10 years ago. so what, if anything, would you do different to make sure part of your democratic in state? >> i'd like to say quickly, i think some countries have taken a bit of an appetite suppressant when he came to their ambitions of being part of the european union, for example. >> but they are democratic. >> but they are democratic. but there also has to be benefit that flows. i think that is very much a part of the typos as to whether people are going to pursue being part of a larger union, being part of an obsession like nato. there has to be some apparent benefit in so doing. you know, the ability
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)